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On Cameras and Choices – What is the Best Camera?

Imagine that you want to build a dog house. Then you find out that you don’t have a hammer. Naturally, you start looking for one. Then you hear stories, legends, and ballads about this great hammer. You embark on a quest to find this legendary artifact. For years you travel through jungles, rivers, oceans, conquer mountains, volcanoes, blizzards and finally you find this supposedly mythical hammer. You take it, go home, and build your dog house. Then it turns out to be crappy. Why? Because you have no experience in carpentry what-so-ever.

Now imagine the outcome if you spent all those years you wasted finding this mythical hammer, honing your skills and carefully designing what you were planning to build. You would end up with a beautifully finished work of art. When you want to make something, do you focus on the product you’re making or the tools you use to get the job done? When you see a beautiful painting, do you ask the artist about his paint brush? When you enjoy a nice meal, do you ask the cook about his stove? Then why do most people end up asking a photographer about his camera?

With the introduction of entry-level DSLRs to the market several years ago, digital photography has become one of the most popular hobbies. Yet one question keeps appearing all over the internet. What is the best camera? It’s very simple. It does not exist. When you post a picture somewhere, there is always that one guy who inquires about the camera you used. The best camera is what you have. You cannot take pictures with a camera that you don’t have. Stop chasing around something that does not exist and learn to use what you have.

Now, a perfectly legitimate question that you can ask a photographer is how he planned the shot and what settings he used. If EXIF data is available to you (in most cases it is) you can easily look at all the settings that were used to make the shot. You can learn a lot from that. But all those famous camera brands have yet to release a camera that takes no bad pictures.

I think the question “what is the best camera?” originated from the misconception that the camera does all the work. But it is a tool just like a paint brush or a hammer. Perhaps the fact that there are so many brands and models is confusing. Why are some cameras more expensive than the others? It’s simply because some offer features that others don’t. Is it absolutely necessary have all these features? Not at all. At the end of the day, a camera just take pictures.

When it comes to buying a camera, you really are spoiled with choices. The range is incredibly large, going from cheap compact point and shoot cameras to high end professional DSLRs that cost as much as a used car. I know I said that the tool you’re using does not matter. But now I’m going to tell you why it would be advantageous to have a decent DSLR. This is a little tricky. Does it matter or not? Well, yes and no. If you can snatch a priceless moment with your cheap pocket camera, that would be much better than a regular snap shot captured by a very expensive DSLR any day. Let me put it this way, it’s something like 75% the photographer and 25% the camera. So it does matter a little. I know, I lied.

So what is the advantage of having a DSLR? First and foremost, it’s electronics vs. mechanics. Compact digital cameras use an electronic shutter system whereas DSLRs use a mechanical shutter system. So the shutter lag in DSLRs is minimal, allowing you to freeze the moment. A DSLR is as fast as you are. Unlike point and shoots that takes couple of seconds to turn on and couple more seconds to take a picture, a DSLR is always ready. Then there is RAW capability of DSLRs, although some compact cameras now offer this feature. But shooting RAW is a story on its own, which I’m hoping to cover in a future post.

DSLRs have larger image sensors than compact cameras. Which means, if you look at a 12MP compact camera and a 12MP DSLR, the DSLR will have larger pixels. Thus it performs way better (higher quality) than the compact camera, especially under low light conditions. High quality and speed, these are the two main advantages of having a DSLR. There’s more but there’s always a catch, isn’t it? The catch is that they are big, heavy, and annoying to lug around. Please do the world a favor and don’t buy a DSLR if you’re just going to keep it on your shelf. You’ve been warned. Now you know it’s heavy and not many people are ready to make the commitment.

Here’s the best and the worst part of having a DSLR. Interchangeable lenses. Why is it the best? Because the quality of the pictures mostly depend on the optics and with specially designed lenses for specific jobs, the performance is fantastic. Worst part? They are going to cost you an arm, a leg, and a liver. Soon you will find out that you’re going to need more than one lens and they cost way more than what you paid for the camera, which is already a hefty sum of cash. Remember, it’s much better to have a cheap camera body and a decent lens than a very expensive body and a crappy lens.

When you buy your first DSLR, it’s easy to get frustrated real fast because you probably only have the kit lens that came with it. The kit lens performs far better than its reputation but it has a lot of limitations. There’s no alternative other than slowly building up your lens arsenal. Until then, stay strong folks!

“Having a camera makes you no more a photographer than having a hammer and some nails makes you a carpenter” – Claude Adams.

DSLR

 

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